On the Road Again:

GOTTAVOTE BUS TOUR

Updates from the bus
  • Valerie Jarrett on Mitt Romney’s backward policies for women

    Today, Jarrett joined the Gotta Vote bus tour in Greensboro, North Carolina, and spoke about the clear contrast between a candidate whose answer to an equal pay question was "binders full of women" and a President whose first piece of legislation helped women fight pay discrimination.

    Valerie Jarrett was in Hempstead, New York, at last night's debate—giving her a front-row seat to Mitt Romney's disastrous answers on women's issues.

    Today, Jarrett joined the Gotta Vote bus tour in Greensboro, North Carolina, and spoke about the clear contrast between a candidate whose answer to an equal pay question was "binders full of women" and a President whose first piece of legislation helped women fight pay discrimination:

    "Do you know what he thinks about every morning, in addition to you? His daughters. As he said last night, he wants them to grow up [with the same opportunities as our sons], which is why the first bill he signed was the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act—equal pay for equal work.

    "Twice we tried to get additional legislation passed through the Congress: the Paycheck Fairness Act. Not a single Republican voted for that, and it would've given women more teeth to go after employers who aren't paying them fairly.

    "You know the other thing the president was clear on last night: He believes a woman should be able to choose what to do with her own body"My mother, who's 83, was talking to my daughter, who's 26. My mother said, "I can't believe you might have to fight the same battles I fought decades ago. That's not right. That's going backward." Romney's economic plan goes backward, his social policies go backward. He's backward. Which way are we? Forward. Which way are we going to go? Forward."

    Help us move forward.

  • North Carolina reacts to the debate

    It's pretty clear to these North Carolinians who won the debate last night.

    Janet from Winston-Salem:

    "President Obama was so engaged. He made good points about health care, especially points about women's issues. Mitt Romney's not really for women's issues. His explanation of his stance on equal pay was so bizarre—and the one thing that stuck out for me was how he said he understood it because he had a woman who had to leave early to make dinner for her kids. I thought, he just doesn't get it at all."

    Tony from High Point:

    "Last night, Barack Obama was the president we elected in '08—the president who will continue to do the job from 2012–2016. The President stood toe to toe with Romney and spoke about that 47 percent. There's an old passage, what you do in the dark will come to light. Romney spoke something behind closed doors that was the true heart of the man. Then, in public, he says something else. You cannot trust a guy like that. The President has been consistent. It's a tough job, but he's done well."

    Dan from Winston-Salem:

    "President Obama did a great job last night. I watched it all. The moment when Romney tried and failed to nail him on his comment [on Libya] in the Rose Garden was priceless. To me, it showed how Romney comes across as hard and uncaring and Obama comes across as caring for the people."

    Jo from High Point:

    "President Obama did excellent. He showed he's presidential, but he got Romney on Libya, he got him on immigration, he got him on health care. He showed Romney for who he is: someone who tells everyone what they want to hear and then lets his surrogates walk it back. That is not what a candidate for president is supposed to do."

    Ellen from Winston-Salem:

    "Romney was flustered last night. The President was much more clear. He just stated his case so much more succinctly, especially on women's issues. Romney's been back and forth—women can't trust him. I think we have to go with someone who's actually done what's in our best interest."

  • Three generations of Charlotteans for Obama

    With exactly three weeks till Election Day, three generations of Charlotte politicos—Mayor Anthony Foxx, former Mayor Harvey Gantt, and Reggie Love—are firing up their home city for the home stretch of this election.

    With exactly three weeks till Election Day, three generations of Charlotte politicos—Mayor Anthony Foxx, former Mayor Harvey Gantt, and Reggie Love—are firing up their home city for the home stretch of this election.

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  • Working till the last minute

    Four years ago, Virginia did something they hadn't done in 44 years: They voted for a Democrat—Barack Obama—for President. And it happened because an unprecedented three in four voters made it to the polls on Election Day.

    Four years ago, Virginia did something they hadn't done in 44 years: They voted for a Democrat—Barack Obama—for President. And it happened because an unprecedented three in four voters made it to the polls on Election Day.

    As Brian Moran, the chair of the Democratic Party of Virginia says, when Virginians vote, Democrats win.

    That made today's Virginia voter registration deadline critical—marching orders the Blacksburg OFA office took to heart. As of today's 5 p.m. deadline, their team of organizers and volunteers collected and submitted around 5,000 voter registration forms from the Virginia Tech community, including a few last-minute ones that organizers dropped off at the county auditor's office (pictured above) with just minutes to spare.

    Gotta Vote

  • Justin Long: “I’m voting for education”

    Actor Justin Long grew up in a middle-class Connecticut home, the son of two teachers who instilled in him a belief and a faith in education. But when he went off to college, student loan debt became overwhelming, and he had to drop out of school after two years. ''So I'm voting for the future. I'm voting for education. I'm voting on behalf of 100 percent of Americans.''

    Actor Justin Long grew up in a middle-class Connecticut home, the son of two teachers who instilled in him a belief and a faith in education. But when he went off to college, student loan debt became overwhelming, and he had to drop out of school after two years. "I ended up lucky," he says, "because I became an actor. But that's a one in a billion shot that I took. We need strong education—we need someone who's concerned about the middle class."

    "I'm proud of what President Obama has done on education," Long says. "I'm proud of him for doubling Pell Grants. I'm proud of student loan reform. I believe in that man. I don't believe in a man who, in order to make a $5 trillion tax cut, is going to gut education. So I'm voting for the future. I'm voting for education. I'm voting on behalf of 100 percent of Americans."

    Gotta Vote

  • Gov. Jen Granholm: “It’s for the entire nation”

    If you saw what former Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm saw, if you watched trickle-down economics ravage your state's economy and manufacturing sector, you'd agree: The choice we face over the next 24 days isn't just a question between two candidates or two parties. It's a moral choice about the direction we want the country to go.

    If you saw what former Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm saw, if you watched trickle-down economics ravage your state's economy and manufacturing sector, you'd agree: The choice we face over the next 24 days isn't just a question between two candidates or two parties. It's a moral choice about the direction we want the country to go.

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