On the Road Again:

GOTTAVOTE BUS TOUR

Updates from the bus
  • "I'm voting for one now"

    The country got a glimpse at who Mitt Romney really is when a video recently leaked showing him dismissing 47 percent of Americans as victims who depend on government handouts. At a Gotta Vote bus tour stop at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire, Dana Wachs, who's running for a seat in the state assembly, told this story of what Romney's comments meant to a man he met knocking on doors:

    "The other day, I was campaigning in my district, and I was going through walk sheets, and I got a couple blocks mixed up—should've gone to the left, but I went to the right and walked up, knocked on the door. Then I turned around and there were pretty conservative bumper stickers on the car, and there were pretty conservative flags flying on the flagpole. I thought, my goodness, I'm going to be in there for a long time.

    "And the door opened, and I said, 'I'm Dana Wachs, and I'm a Democrat running for the state assembly.' And this guy wheeled up to the door in a wheelchair, and he put his hand out, and he said, 'You're a Democrat?' I said yeah. He said, 'I've never voted for a Democrat, but I was wounded in the war, and I'm voting for one now.'"

    If you don't want a president who's so quick to dismiss our combat troops and disabled veterans as "victims," then you gotta vote.

  • Wisconsin’s Hmong community supports the President

    During a Gotta Vote bus tour stop at the Schofield Oriental Market, a grocery store and gathering place for the Hmong community in Wausau, Thomas, OFA's Hmong vote director, says his community—more than 50,000 strong in Wisconsin—stands with President Obama.

    During a Gotta Vote bus tour stop at the Schofield Oriental Market, a grocery store and gathering place for the Hmong community in Wausau, Thomas, OFA's Hmong vote director, says his community—more than 50,000 strong in Wisconsin—stands with President Obama.

    "We are very supportive of the President," says Thomas. "We are the middle class and the lower class, and what the President has done for the last four years has greatly benefited the community. We need him to continue."

    Like so many others we've met on the Gotta Vote bus, Lee says the Affordable Care Act has had a major impact on his family. "I have three kids who have graduated from high school and went on to college, and now my health insurance does cover my children. That has been very good for my family."

    So Lee has been doing his part to get out the vote across the state, educating Hmong Americans about voter registration and early voting and recruiting members of the community to volunteer at the local field office—whatever it takes for Wisconsin to be blue on November 6.

    Gotta Vote

  • Beau Biden on priorities

    The Gotta Vote bus tour rolled into Green Bay, Wisconsin, this morning with a special guest: Delaware Attorney General Beau Biden, son of Vice President Biden. With 27 days left till Election Day, Biden joined union members, students, retirees, and volunteers to stand up against a Republican ticket that wants to divide America.

    The Gotta Vote bus tour rolled into Green Bay, Wisconsin, this morning with a special guest: Delaware Attorney General Beau Biden, son of Vice President Biden. With 27 days left till Election Day, Biden joined union members, students, retirees, and volunteers to stand up against a Republican ticket that wants to divide America.

    "Behind me are those 47 percent that Romney talked about," says Biden. "Let me tell you something. The disabled vet I met in Marshalltown, Iowa, the disabled vets in this district, they don't view themselves as victims. They would return to their unit if they could. My grandmother, she didn't view herself as entitled to anything. She paid into the system and she earned her Medicare and Social Security. Moms, dads, working two, three, four jobs to put dinner on the table and provide for their families? They don't view themselves as irresponsible. They are responsible. They are the middle class."

    President Obama and Vice President Biden get that, he says. They're working to build the economy from the middle class out, creating more than 5.2 million jobs and helping put our veterans to work when they come home. That's something that hits home for Biden, a member of the Delaware National Guard who served his country in Iraq. He says that when it comes to taking care of his fellow veterans, Ryan and the Democratic candidates have a fundamentally different view—and the proof is in the budget.

    "My father always said, don't tell me your priorities," says Biden. "Show me your budget, and I'll tell you what your priorities are. Well, let's look at Mr. Ryan's budget. If you believe his math, he would cut 20 percent from the VA. That would amount to an $11 billion cut that would've gone to health care for veterans—22 million veterans nationally.

    "We have been a generation at war for a decade. What is Mr. Ryan's priority? In 2002 and 2003, while Americans were going off to war, he was voting for a tax break for the wealthiest Americans that no one wanted or needed that blew up our budget. In 2012, he wants to do the very same thing. He has a fundamentally different set of values than my father and the President have. He's more concerned with giving the .1 percent a tax break than he is looking out for those of us who have served in Iraq and and are veterans."

    If you'd rather take care of our veterans than give millionaires and billionaires another tax cut, then you gotta vote. You can still register to vote in Wisconsin and in many states across the country. Find everything you need to know about voting at www.gottavote.com.

  • Tracee Ellis Ross: No regrets on November 7

    Tracee Ellis Ross has been in movies and on TV for years—but hitting the campaign trail reminds her of how she felt when she first started auditioning for acting roles: nervous. Even though talking to voters about the election gives her jitters, Ross believes that it's so important to do whatever she can to help President Obama get re-elected. So today, she flew out to Ohio to energize college students and African American voters as ''one of millions of volunteers.''

    Tracee Ellis Ross has been in movies and on TV for years—but hitting the campaign trail reminds her of how she felt when she first started auditioning for acting roles: nervous. Even though campaigning gives her jitters, Ross believes that it's so important to do whatever she can to help President Obama get re-elected. So today, she flew out to Ohio to energize college students and African American voters as "one of millions of volunteers."

    There's too much at stake to sit on the sidelines, she says. "I care about my community. I care about human rights, civil rights, women's rights. And when it comes to women's rights, there's no question: President Obama was raised by a powerful women, married a powerful woman, and is raising two powerful women. He gets women's issues." She cites President Obama's support for equal pay, the first bill he signed into law as president. "Mitt Romney refused to support equal pay, and Paul Ryan actually voted against it."

    She says one thing in this election is certain: President Obama's the only candidate with a plan to keep us moving forward. We've come too far on the road to recovery to turn back—and that hits closer to home than you might think.

    "My best friend is a mother of three with three jobs," says Ross. "She and her husband are still struggling to make ends meet. One of her jobs does not pay a ton, but it has health care for her family. There are families like hers across the country and here in Ohio with similar stories. So I have to ask you—we have to ask ourselves: Who truly cares about creating opportunities for you? Barack Obama."

    At stops at Ohio State and Wright State, campaign offices, and outside a Dayton beauty shop, Ross's message was the same: You gotta vote.

    "Voting is one of the ways I know I'm alive—one of the ways I know that I matter. I remind myself that I am enough to make a difference. No matter where I come from or who I am, my voice makes a difference. I hear from people, 'Oh, Mitt Romney has no chance.' Well, if you think that, he might. We have got to do our part because it's going to be close. Do you want to wake up November 7 wondering, 'What if I had done a little more?' Let's make sure we wake up joyous , not regretful."

    If you want no regrets on November 7, find out how to vote in your state and sign up to volunteer.

  • Ohio small business stands with Barack Obama

    President Obama calls small businesses the backbone of our economy, and he's made good on his word: The Obama administration has helped more than 5,000 African American business owners secure more than $1.5 billion in Small Business Administration loans. Under President Obama's watch, minorities who want to start their own business have had greater access to the tools and resources they need to do so.

    President Obama calls small businesses the backbone of our economy, and he's made good on his word: The Obama administration has helped more than 5,000 African American business owners secure more than $1.5 billion in Small Business Administration loans. Under President Obama's watch, minorities who want to start their own business have had greater access to the tools and resources they need to do so.

    Keitha is an example. In July, she opened the doors to My Own Soul, a restaurant in Toledo that serves local food, made to order. Business is good, she says, and it's only picking up as our economy continues to recover.

    "I think that Obama has to stay in business," she says. "He's paved the way for small-business owners like myself—all the money that he's put into different grants and tax cuts. If he stays in office, it'll only get better, for me and for the generations after me who want to be business owners and entrepreneurs. Mitt Romney, I don't think he's for small business at all‹or entrepreneurship, finding a way for people who are coming from nothing to try to make something."

    She's doing her part to make sure the Obama administration does stay in business. Along with soul food, she hands out voter registration forms to her customers. To date, she's registered 1,0­13 new voters in Toledo, and she's urging everyone to make their voices heard by voting in this election.

    "We gotta get out," she says, "and we gotta vote."

  • The story of Ohio

    Despite fierce Republican opposition—including from the current Republican nominee for president—President Obama lent a hand to an American auto industry in crisis and saved nearly 1 million good, American jobs up and down the supply chain. It was an important step on our road to recovery. We were once shedding 800,000 jobs a month, but today, we've seen 31 consecutive months of job growth and 5.2 million new private-sector jobs. Manufacturing jobs are being created at rates we haven't seen since the 1990s.

    President Obama's decision to save the auto industry, says Senator Sherrod Brown, makes the choice for Ohio clear.

    "Let me tell you what the auto rescue means," he tells supporters at today's Gotta Vote bus stop in Ashland, Ohio. "You know what it means, because you live in north-central Ohio. The story of the Chevy Cruze is in many ways the story of Ohio. The engine was made in Defiance. The transmission came out of Toledo. The seat frames come out of Lorain. The steel comes out of Middletown. The sound system comes out of Springboro. The brackets come out of Brunswick. The stamping's done in Parma. The seats come from Warren. And 4,500 UAW workers put it together in Youngstown.

    "We know if we're going to rebuild the middle class, it means manufacturing, it means good union jobs, it means good jobs for the middle class. And that's really what this election is about."

    But, as Senator Brown points out, we can't rebuild the middle class if we don't vote: "You have the advantage, because one of the great things about living in Ohio is that we all, frankly, get to choose the next president of the United States. We get to choose which party's going to control the United States Senate. You have it in your hands, as activists and people who care—people who are fighting for the next four weeks. You can make a huge difference."

    You can make a difference no matter which state you live in—but first, you gotta register to vote.

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