People

Democratic Women’s Alliance

Why now?

During the 2012 election cycle, there was a systematic effort on the part of the Republican Party to strip women of the legal rights they’d fought for and earned, or to deny them rights that had been settled generations ago. From reproductive rights to economic security to quality health care, women’s rights were front and center in 2012; in fact,they were under attack.

There are 158 million women living in the US. They represent 58% the American labor force and more than 66% of eligible women are registered to vote. In 2012, more women cast a vote than men and 55% voted for Barack Obama — contributing to the largest gender gap recorded in U.S. history.

Women are engaging more and more in the political process whether they are candidates for office or educating themselves about the best candidate to represent them in Washington. More women are following politics through social media and other outlets than any other group. Women are the primary decision makers in many households when it comes to issues such as education, healthcare and family budget. And when women compare the two party platforms, Democrats must make it clear that the natural home for women is the Democratic Party. By building on a successful foundation led by the 2012 women’s working group, we will continue making gains in 2014, 2016, and beyond for all Americans.

Recent Updates
  • 3 Takeaways from the GOP’s Latest Poll of Women

    Republicans are out of touch, and now they have the data to prove it. Earlier this week, Politico released details of a survey funded in part by Karl Rove’s PAC. Here are our three key takeaways from the research (not that we expect them to change the GOP’s attitudes toward women).

    1. Republicans “fail to speak to women in the different circumstances in which they live.”

    Republicans’ research found that women “believe that ‘enforcing equal pay for equal work’ is the policy that would ‘help women the most.’” Women still make just 77 cents for every dollar earned by a man, adding up to over $430,000 in lost compensation on average in a lifetime. By repeatedly voting against policies to ensure that women receive equal pay, the report warns, “Republicans who openly deny the legitimacy of the issue will be seen as out of touch with women’s life experiences.”

    2. Republicans are “stuck in the past.”

    The women polled for the report described Republicans as “intolerant” and “lacking in compassion.” In an effort to change this image, the GOP wants to, in the words of the study, “pursue policy innovations that inspire women voters to give the GOP a ‘fresh look.’” Suggestions included “strengthening enforcement against gender bias in the workplace.” The only problem? We’re still waiting for Republicans to join us in supporting the Paycheck Fairness Act!

    3. The GOP isn’t changing their position; they’re changing the subject.

    When it comes to addressing the issues that matter to women the most, Republicans are quick to change the subject. The research concludes that when it comes to tough issues like reproductive health, Republican leaders should “deal honestly with any disagreement on abortion, then move to other issues.” But Republicans aren’t moving on – they’re committing time and taxpayer money to restricting access to reproductive health care. That’s time they could be spending on policies that help working families, like raising the minimum wage, expanding access to paid sick leave, and making childcare more affordable.

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  • Stand with Florida Women

    As we close out National Women’s Health Week, I’m struck by the dramatic contrast between Republicans’ and Democrats’ priorities when it comes to women’s health.

    Democrats are hard at work helping women access health care by defending the Affordable Care Act, and with it, no co-pay preventive care, guaranteed access to maternity coverage, and ending discrimination by health insurance companies based on pre-existing conditions or gender. And, of course, we believe that a woman’s health care decisions should be made between her and her doctor. Period. Not her boss. And certainly not politicians.

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  • 50 years later voting rights still threatened

    Nearly 50 years ago, President Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act, to outlaw discrimination based on race, religion, gender, and more. The law strengthened voting rights and pushed for an end to racial segregation in schools, at the workplace and in public places. Unfortunately, today's GOP retreats headlong from the battle towards greater equality. In fact, many Republican are trying to sabotage or undermine crucial protections in the Civil Rights Act.

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  • On National Equal Pay Day

    On National Equal Pay Day, we are reminded of how we impede our own success when we refuse to compensate women equally. Women still make just 77 cents for every dollar earned by a man. Over a lifetime, that adds up to more than $430,000 in lost compensation for her, her family, and our economy. For Hispanic and African American women, the gap is shamefully even greater.

    Read More
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Recent Action
President Obama Appoints Four More Women to Federal Judgeships
May 17, 2013
President Obama nominated four women to federal judgeships, further illustrating his dedication to creating a federal judiciary that better reflects our nation.
Violence Against Women Act Reauthorized
March 7, 2013
President Obama signed the reauthorization of VAWA — a groundbreaking piece of the legislation that combats sexual assault by holding offenders responsible while aiding victims.
President commits to battling HIV/AIDS
December 7, 2011
On World AIDS Day President Obama directed $50 million in increased funding for the treatment and care of HIV/AIDS, a disease that disproportionally affects women both internationally and domestically.