People

Democratic Women’s Alliance

Why now?

During the 2012 election cycle, there was a systematic effort on the part of the Republican Party to strip women of the legal rights they’d fought for and earned, or to deny them rights that had been settled generations ago. From reproductive rights to economic security to quality health care, women’s rights were front and center in 2012; in fact,they were under attack.

There are 158 million women living in the US. They represent 58% the American labor force and more than 66% of eligible women are registered to vote. In 2012, more women cast a vote than men and 55% voted for Barack Obama — contributing to the largest gender gap recorded in U.S. history.

Women are engaging more and more in the political process whether they are candidates for office or educating themselves about the best candidate to represent them in Washington. More women are following politics through social media and other outlets than any other group. Women are the primary decision makers in many households when it comes to issues such as education, healthcare and family budget. And when women compare the two party platforms, Democrats must make it clear that the natural home for women is the Democratic Party. By building on a successful foundation led by the 2012 women’s working group, we will continue making gains in 2014, 2016, and beyond for all Americans.

Recent Updates
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Recent Action
President Obama Appoints Four More Women to Federal Judgeships
May 17, 2013
President Obama nominated four women to federal judgeships, further illustrating his dedication to creating a federal judiciary that better reflects our nation.
Violence Against Women Act Reauthorized
March 7, 2013
President Obama signed the reauthorization of VAWA — a groundbreaking piece of the legislation that combats sexual assault by holding offenders responsible while aiding victims.
President commits to battling HIV/AIDS
December 7, 2011
On World AIDS Day President Obama directed $50 million in increased funding for the treatment and care of HIV/AIDS, a disease that disproportionally affects women both internationally and domestically.