People

Internships

If you have any questions regarding the program, please contact Dana Berardi at internapp@dnc.org or 202-863-8000.

Internship Timeline
Fall 2014 Spring 2015
Application Posted Jan 6, 2014 Apr 17, 2014
Application Deadline Mar 31, 2014 Oct 31, 2014
Start Date Sep 2, 2014 Jan 13, 2015
End Date Dec 12, 2014 May 1, 2015


FAQ

Who can apply?

Applicants must be 18 years of age on or before the first day of the internship, and meet at least one of the following criteria:

  • Currently enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate program at a college, community college, or university (two-to-four year institution)
  • Graduated from an undergraduate or graduate program at a college, community college, or university (two-to-four year institution) no more than two years before the first day of the internship
  • A veteran of the United States Armed Forces who possesses a high school diploma or its equivalent and has served on active duty, for any length of time, in the two years preceding the first day of the internship

What is the DNC’s role in Democratic politics?

The DNC performs many roles within Democratic politics, the most important of which is working to elect Democrats at all levels of government, especially the presidency. The DNC also works to help enact the President’s agenda.

As a DNC intern what will I be doing on a daily basis?

Intern responsibilities and tasks vary depending on department, but all interns play an important role in their departments. While all interns will perform some administrative tasks, making copies — filing, etc. — the work you do is vital to the day to day functions and department projects DNC staff are working on. For example:

  • Communications allows interns to work closely with the media, collecting daily news clips, formatting press releases, and monitoring television appearances by Democratic surrogates.

What is the dress code at the DNC?

The dress code is business casual.

Do I need to be a Democrat to intern at the DNC?

The DNC expects all interns to be Democrats and registered voters.

How many hours per week should I expect to work?

During the summer months we expect interns to work full time (40 hours). During the fall and spring when students are in school, we ask that interns commit to at least 20 hours per week. However, if you have scheduling issues, please let us know.

Are DNC internships paid?

All DNC internships are on an unpaid, volunteer basis.

How should I respond to the essay questions?

Each of the essay questions should be answered separately. Each response should be no more than 500 words in length. Do not exceed the word limit.

My school is on the quarter system. Can I still participate?

Yes. You are welcome to apply, as long as you can commit to the full term of the internship program.


Equal Employment Opportunity Policy

The Democratic National Committee (DNC), is committed to diversity among its staff, and recognizes that its continued success requires the highest commitment to obtaining and retaining a diverse staff that provides the best quality services to supporters and constituents. The DNC is an equal opportunity employer and it is our policy to recruit, hire, train, promote and administer any and all personnel actions without regard to sex, race, age, color, creed, national origin, religion, economic status, sexual orientation, veteran status, gender identity or expression, ethnic identity or physical disability, or any other legally protected basis. The DNC will not tolerate any unlawful discrimination and any such conduct is strictly prohibited.

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    I can't believe it's finally here! For months, our team's been working around the clock reviewing resumes, arranging flights, coordinating logistics, and securing some of the best and brightest public servants, elected officials and political professionals to serve as mentors and guest speakers.

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    When I came to the DNC as the new Finance Director, I thought it was important to do some of the things we did well back in the day. That's why we launched the Hope Institute — a crash course in politics for 40 young adults from underrepresented communities.

    These next two days are going to be intense. We've put together a packed schedule with speakers, networking opportunities, and real life campaign scenarios. And we've got some surprises too.

    I can't wait to meet everyone tonight and look forward to sharing stories from the events. As Democrats, we believe in change that matters. That's why we invest in young people who care.

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    P.S. Fun fact: I met my beautiful wife while we were working together on the "Yes We Can" campaign. And that's just one of the many great things to come out of it. Excited to get started!

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The majority of the Armed Forces is comprised of Young Americans volunteering to defend this nation and its ideals. However, a sect of the population was forced to hide their sexual orientation in order to do so. President Obama lead the charge to repeal Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell allowing gay and lesbian members of the Armed Forces to serve openly for the first time in American history.
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Milestones