Issues

Voting Rights

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Democrats have a long and proud history of fighting for voting rights that continues to this day. And while we've made significant progress in securing the right to vote for all eligible Americans, many voters still face difficulties in the voting process, from registering to casting a ballot to having their votes counted. Those often disproportionately affected are communities of color, young people, the elderly, low-income individuals, and disabled voters, as well as military members and veterans. In many parts of the country, voters are underserved by a lack of polling places, outdated voting machines, and unnecessarily complicated laws.

As Republican politicians try to make it harder to vote, Democrats are working to expand access to the polls. And we won't stop working to promote a system of elections that is accessible, open, and fair — a system that ensures that every eligible person can cast a vote and that every lawfully cast vote is counted.

To learn more about why voting rights matter, visit: www.votingrightsmatter.com.

Recent Updates
  • Debbie Wasserman Schultz: “Four things you need to know”

    In an email, Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz shared the Democrats' four-point strategy for winning elections in 2013, 2014 and beyond and encouraged supporters to get involved.

    Friend --

    I just got back from the DNC summer meeting in Arizona, so I thought I'd let you in on our strategy for the upcoming year and beyond (because I'm really excited about it).

    We have a four-pronged plan for the coming year:

    Recruiting and training top talent. Our party is only as strong as the people in it. So we're going to focus on identifying great candidates for state and local offices, training organizers across the country, and helping talented young people from all backgrounds break into politics through our Hope Institute program.

    Maintaining and building our digital edge. A big part of the reason we won last year is because our online program and tools were light years ahead of the Republicans. But that's the thing about cutting-edge technology -- it stops being cutting-edge pretty quickly. We're not going to rest on our laurels. We're going to work hard to maintain our edge while developing the next generation of tools.

    Expanding access to the ballot box. Every single thing we do as a party centers on our most fundamental right as Americans -- the right to vote. You've seen Republicans across the country restrict that right by taking advantage of the recent Supreme Court decision to gut the Voting Rights Act. And we're going to be fighting back by launching a national voter protection program.

    Holding Republicans accountable and promoting the Democratic agenda. You've heard Republicans talk a lot about how they're "rebranding" their party and agenda to be more inclusive after last year's election. But if you've been paying attention to the policies they're supporting, you've noticed that they've only gotten more extreme. We're going to make sure they don't get away with that bait-and-switch.

    Many people are going to work very hard to make sure this plan succeeds, but I have to be straight with you: a main factor in its success or failure will be whether we have the resources to pull it off.

    Chip in $10 or more today and make sure we can put our plan into motion:

    https://my.democrats.org/Our-Strategy

    This is a winning plan -- and I can't wait to get to work on it with you, because we saw last year what we're capable of.

    Thanks,

    Debbie

    Debbie Wasserman Schultz
    Chair
    Democratic National Committee


    P.S. -- You've seen what we can do when we get this organization operating at its peak -- let's do it again.

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Protecting the Vote The Real Cost of Photo ID Laws: Read the Report
Recent Action
Vetoing suppressive photo identification laws
May 26, 2011
Gov. Dayton of Minnesota vetoed S0509, a law that would have required government-issued photo ID in order to vote.
Vetoing suppressive photo identification laws
Gov. Dayton of Minnesota vetoed S0509, a law that would have required government-issued photo ID in order to vote.
Milestones