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  • Stand with President Obama and Democrats

    It's clear that 2012 election didn't usher in a less-extreme Republican Party. As the GOP prepares to vote on the Ryan budget, which gives the wealthiest Americans a massive tax cut at the expense of the middle class, it's more important than ever that we stand with President Obama and Democrats to protect our progress and move forward.

    Check out this email our chair, Debbie Wasserman Schultz, just sent to Democrats nationwide, then add your name to show your support.

    Friend --

    This week, my Republican colleagues in the House of Representatives will vote to give the wealthiest Americans a massive tax cut paid for by seniors, middle-class families, and students.

    This is a wake-up call. Last year's election didn't make the Republicans' policies any less extreme, and it didn't make them any less eager to enact them.

    I'm standing with President Obama and my Democratic colleagues to make good on the progress Americans voted for this past November, and I need you to stand with us.

    We've accomplished a tremendous amount together over the past four years, but it couldn't be more clear that our opponents will roll all of that progress back if we give them a chance. Let's not give them one.

    Let President Obama and other Democrats know that you're with us:

    http://my.democrats.org/Stand-with-President-Obama

    Thanks,

    Debbie

    Debbie Wasserman Schultz
    Chair
    Democratic National Committee

    P.S. -- Knowing who we can count on is important. If you're one of those people, please let us know.

  • Sound familiar?

    Paul Ryan's latest budget cuts taxes for the wealthy more than twice as much as Mitt Romney proposed. The only possible way Ryan and the Republicans could pay for such a deficit-busting plan would be with higher middle-class taxes, more debt, or both. Sound familiar?

    Paul Ryan's latest budget cuts taxes for the wealthy more than twice as much as Mitt Romney proposed. The only possible way Ryan and the Republicans could pay for such a deficit-busting plan would be with higher middle-class taxes, more debt, or both. Sound familiar?

  • “The worst of the Ryan budgets”

    Paul Ryan's "new" budget isn't just more of the same failed policy that the American people rejected decisively in the fall—it's "the worst of the Ryan budgets," "callous," and "ill-conceived." Share this if you're not interested in the Ryan-Republican top-down approach to our economy.

    Paul Ryan's "new" budget isn't just more of the same failed policy that the American people rejected decisively in the fall—it's "the worst of the Ryan budgets," "callous," and "ill-conceived." Share this if you're not interested in the Ryan-Republican top-down approach to our economy.

  • New Washington Post–ABC News poll shows it’s time for Republicans to listen to the American people

    After experiencing a devastating loss on November 6, you’d think that Republicans would have learned one of the lessons of the election: put aside ideology and work with Democrats on balanced solutions to the challenges America faces. But as we’ve seen over the past few months, Republicans continue to push the extreme positions that the American people rejected last November and are refusing to meet President Obama and Democrats halfway to find a balanced approach to our nation’s fiscal issues. We’ve seen this most clearly during the sequester debate: While Americans want the sequester to end and replace it with a smarter, balanced approach that asks the wealthy to pay a little more, Republicans are sticking to a cuts-only approach that slashes the very investments our nation needs to make to create jobs and get our economy humming again. Rather than taking stock after losing yet another national election on the very issues that are dominating the current debate over fiscal issues and trying to find common ground, Republicans are doubling down on their failed approach—and voters are noticing.

    Today’s Washington Post–ABC News Poll tells exactly that story. Americans’ disapproval of congressional Republicans is a stunning 72 percent—their highest disapproval in more than a year, not coincidentally coming one week after the GOP-forced sequester began. Why is this? Because Republicans refuse to compromise to get anything done. They refused to work with the President to find a solution that would have averted the sequester, and now the public is rejecting the indiscriminate across-the-board cuts Republicans chose over closing even one loophole that benefits the wealthiest. In fact, support for the Republican approach is dropping like a rock. In a WaPo-ABC poll prior to the sequester, 61 percent of Americans supported the cuts. Today, only 39 percent of Americans in the WaPo-ABC poll approve of them.

    And it gets worse for the GOP. Today’s poll shows that Americans are worried about the effects of the GOP sequester on the economy—only 28 percent want the cuts to continue, and by a 2-to-1 margin, Americans believe the cuts will hurt our economy and our military readiness. It’s perhaps not surprising then that today’s poll found that nearly half of all Americans—47 percent—blame Republicans for the sequester itself.

    And Americans don’t just blame Republicans for the sequester. They also reject their approach to replacing it and their fiscal priorities generally. A whopping 71 percent of Americans disapprove of Republicans’ proposals to cut Medicaid, and six in 10 oppose raising the Medicare eligibility age to 67.

    Despite all this, Republicans have embraced the sequester and a cuts-only approach to addressing our fiscal challenges. Republicans have alternatively praised the sequester or attempted to downplay its effects: One Tennessee Republican representative, Marsha Blackburn, said she and her constituents were “relieved” the sequester took place while Senator Rand Paul has said that the sequester, which could cost the country 800,000 jobs or more, is a “pittance.” Today’s poll shows Republicans are losing the argument on the sequester no matter which of those two messages, or any other, they trot out.

    Today’s WaPo-ABC poll is not a case of Republicans and the President splitting the difference on public opinion and girding for future battles on roughly equal footing. At a disapproval rating of 72 percent, congressional Republicans and their approach to the issues is being rejected by Americans from all walks of life—including by moderate (81 percent) and independent voters (74 percent). And, adding insult to self-inflicted injury, 53 percent of Republicans in the poll disapprove of the job performance of Republicans in Congress.

    My mama had some good advice for me growing up: "Son, if you’re stuck in a hole, stop digging." Republicans should put down the shovel and talk to mama.

  • 48 years after Bloody Sunday, the fight for voting rights continues

    In 1965, 600 Americans set out on foot toward Montgomery, Alabama, marching for a fairer America where all eligible citizens could register to vote and cast a ballot without fear or intimidation—and have their votes counted.

    But when they reached the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, the marchers were met by state troopers, who ordered the "unlawful assembly" to disperse. As they knelt to pray, the peaceful protesters were brutally attacked by 150 troopers with billy clubs and tear gas. Fifty-eight people, including a 25-year-old John Lewis, were sent to the hospital with injuries. March 7, 1965, became known as Bloody Sunday.

    In 2013, more than 15,000 citizens re-creating the march were joined by the Vice President of the United States, who crossed the bridge arm-in-arm with Congressman Lewis and many others who led the fight for voting rights. We've made a tremendous amount of progress in 48 years. But even in 2013, the fight continues.

    Right now, the Supreme Court is considering challenges to the Voting Rights Act, whose 1965 passage was spurred by the resolve of the marchers at Selma. The Voting Rights Act struck down Jim Crow laws and measures intended to disenfranchise African American voters. In the years since, this historic, still-vitally necessary piece of legislation has been reauthorized four times with tremendous bipartisan support. The provision in question says that any changes in voting laws or procedures in the 16 states and jurisdictions with a history of voter discrimination must be pre-cleared with the federal government—but even in 2013, it's necessary to ensure everyone who wants to cast a ballot can.

    Just last year, Republican governors, state legislatures, and conservative activists passed laws making it more difficult to vote—laws that would have a significantly disproportionate impact on minorities, the very populations whose access to the ballot has been protected by the Voting Rights Act for nearly half a century. Republicans tried a variety of tactics: slashing the amount of time available for early voting, enacting photo ID laws, and voter purges. Democrats and voting rights activists challenged many of these restrictions in court, and the courts blocked many of the worst measures.

    But what stood out the most in 2012 was the persistence of everyday citizens who were determined to cast their ballots. From the 300,000 Ohioans whose signatures fought back against attempts to change election rules to the 102-year-old voter in Florida who was told she'd have to wait in line for six hours to cast a ballot, the American people refused to let others trample on our rights—the rights that marchers, 48 years ago today, fought so hard for.

    As President Obama said just weeks ago in his second inaugural address, "We, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths—that all of us are created equal—is the star that guides us still; just as it guided our forebears through Seneca Falls, and Selma, and Stonewall; just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsung, who left footprints along this great Mall, to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone; to hear a King proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on Earth.

    "It is now our generation’s task to carry on what those pioneers began."

    For more information on voting rights, check out the Voting Rights Institute and sign up for updates.

  • The GOP sequester: Defenseless

    Republicans continue to refuse to work with President Obama and Democrats to reach a balanced approach to reducing the deficit and averting the sequester. Their insistence on putting politics first has put our nation's military preparedness on the line and jeopardized the livelihood of the 800,000 Defense Department employees who now face furloughs—the consequences of which are already being felt across the country. Here's a snapshot.

    Republicans continue to refuse to work with President Obama and Democrats to reach a balanced approach to reducing the deficit and averting the sequester. Their insistence on putting politics first has put our nation's military preparedness on the line and jeopardized the livelihood of the 800,000 Defense Department employees who now face furloughs—the consequences of which are already being felt across the country. Here's a snapshot:

    As many as 27,000 civilian military employees will be furloughed in Alabama, which will cause an estimated loss of more than $1.9 billion to the state.

    The Air Force faces furloughs for 180,000 civilian workers, resulting in the loss of 31.5 million man hours of productivity.

    Major General James McConville said in a speech at Kentucky's Fort Campbell: "I wondered if people really understood what the effects of sequestration and a pending furlough would do to our civilian workforce and the families of this division as we went off to war. I wondered if they knew that our great mission support element…will be limited to a 32-hour work week and incur a 20 percent pay cut. I wondered if they were aware that our teachers are government service employees and that the kids of our deployed soldiers will only be able to go to school four days a week."

    At El Paso's Fort Bliss, most of the 11,000 civilian employees on base will be hit with a 20 percent pay cut starting April 21 until the end of September.

    A $30 million construction project intended to fix South Bend's National Guard Armory has been put on hold because of the GOP sequester.

    Navy frigates will stop conducting drug patrols in the Caribbean and end their participation in a joint operation that stopped 160 tons of cocaine rom reaching U.S. streets—all because of the GOP sequester.

    Tell Republicans to put our country first. Add your name now.

  • See how the GOP sequester is hurting communities nationwide

    When they chose not to come to the table and stop the sequester, Republicans in Congress declared tax breaks for rich were more important than jobs or education, health care or defense. Check out—and share—http://www.gopsequester.com/ to see how the the GOP sequester is hurting communities across the country.

    When they chose not to come to the table and stop the sequester, Republicans in Congress declared tax breaks for rich were more important than jobs or education, health care or defense. Check out—and share—http://www.gopsequester.com/ to see how the the GOP sequester is hurting communities across the country.

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