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Romney economics isn’t welcome in Detroit

For many Detroiters, the "Middle Class Under the Bus" tour was a chance to stand up in support of the man who stood up for them in a moment of need—and to send Mitt Romney an unmistakable message: Romney economics isn't welcome here.

Our bus pulled into Detroit this afternoon for the last stop on our "Middle Class Under the Bus" tour—a fitting place to end a tour that centered on Romney economics. Just three and a half years, ago, Detroit's auto industry—the city's lifeblood—was on the very brink of collapse. And in that moment of crisis, Mitt Romney said four words the Motor City will never forget:

"Let Detroit go bankrupt."

Fast forward to 2012. Today, the American auto industry is back where it belongs: at the top. But it's not because anyone heeded Romney's advice. It's because President Obama placed his bet on the American worker and on American manufacturing and made a tough call that saved more than 1 million good-paying, middle-class jobs up and down the supply chain.

So for many Detroiters, today's press conference was a chance to stand up in support of the man who stood up for them in a moment of need—and to send Mitt Romney an unmistakable message: Romney economics isn't welcome here.

Just ask Veila, who tells a story that resonates for so many in this town. Veila proudly says she's a product of an automotive company—and can't understand how someone who calls himself a "son of Detroit" could turn his back on an industry that puts food on the table, sends kids to college, and lets a hard-working person achieve their piece of the American Dream.

"My dad worked for Ford for 45, 46 years," Veila says. "And I didn't realize how important a role it played in our upbringing. I am who I am today—the house that we live in, the food we ate, the vacations that we took are all because of his job at Ford.

"And I could not understand why someone would allow the automotive companies to go down. I'm just an example of many, many people, particularly in Detroit, who have gone through this. Retirement, my mother's health insurance all depended on the automotive companies staying up and running.

"I just want people to know that that was a very important part of America's economy—and how dare somebody come here and think it wasn't important to revive them. So for that, with other reasons, that's why I support the President."

Check out more photos from our bus tour on our Flickr page.