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Young People & Students

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Students and young Americans have long played an important role in the Democratic Party—perhaps never more so than in Barack Obama's historic campaign. While young people and students represent our next generation of leaders, they realize that we can’t wait to tackle America’s foremost challenges. Just as we learned in 2008, students know that if we work hard enough, and if we fight long enough, we can finally bring change to Washington and to our country.

Over the past 18 months, students and young people have embodied the spirit of that movement for change—from their work on health reform to student loan reform and more.

The Democratic National Committee’s Youth Coordinating Council—commonly known as the Youth Council—was made an official council of the Democratic National Committee in December 2005, with a goal of increasing involvement of young people in the Democratic Party.

Every year since its creation, the Youth Council has become more and more active and has helped maintain high participation rates and foster greater political involvement. Young people have had new opportunities to become more active with local and national Democrats, and help shape our party across the country for decades to come.

Recent Updates
  • Women’s History Month

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    I have been thinking about Women’s History Month and how to mark its passing for a while. This month has always been a time of reflection, a chance to look back on all that women have accomplished for themselves and the contributions they have made to American history.

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  • #CelebrateBlackHistory - Natasha McKenzie, President of the College Democrats of America

    During my freshman year at Trinity University I attended my first College Democrats meeting on campus. It was inspiring to interact with other students similarly dedicated to becoming politically active and that aimed to elect democratic candidates that stood for issues essential to the betterment of society such as student loan reform and marriage equality.

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  • 50 years later voting rights still threatened

    Nearly 50 years ago, President Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act, to outlaw discrimination based on race, religion, gender, and more. The law strengthened voting rights and pushed for an end to racial segregation in schools, at the workplace and in public places. Unfortunately, today's GOP retreats headlong from the battle towards greater equality. In fact, many Republican are trying to sabotage or undermine crucial protections in the Civil Rights Act.

    Read More
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Young People & Students
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Recent Action
Student Loan Debt Repayment Reform
October 28, 2011
In an effort to help put America back to work, President Obama refined the repayment process of federal loans allowing students to lower their rates to 10% of their discretionary income. The proposal will allow 1.6 million students to cap their loan payments making college more affordable than ever.
Repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell
The majority of the Armed Forces is comprised of Young Americans volunteering to defend this nation and its ideals. However, a sect of the population was forced to hide their sexual orientation in order to do so. President Obama lead the charge to repeal Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell allowing gay and lesbian members of the Armed Forces to serve openly for the first time in American history.
Health Care Reform for Young Americans
The Affordable Care Act opened access to health care to millions of Americans. Young Americans in particular saw change in the elimination of preexisting conditions for minors and the ability to stay on a parent or guardian’s health insurance plan until the age of 26 allowing them to finish school or search for a job without worrying about their health care.
Milestones